10 Reasons For A New OCI Card

 

 

1.  When you are issued a new passport.2. If you are younger than 21, OCI documents must be re-issued each time you get a new passport.

3. If you are are 50 years of age or older, OCI documents must be re-issued once after the issuance of a new passport.

4. If your OCI card was issued for the first time after you were 50,  then you do not need a new OCI card.

5. If you are between the ages of 21 to 49 years of age, there is no need to re-issue OCI documents each time you are issued a new passport.  But you can request the consulate to re-issue the OCI documents with the new passport number.

6. You need a new OCI if there is a change in personal particulars.

7. You need a new OCI if you lose or your OCI documents are damaged.

8. You need a new OCI if you made a mistake in your personal particulars while filing the application online.

9. You need a new OCI if you change your address or occupation.

10. It is less expensive to apply for a new visa for your minor children born in the United States, than to re-apply each time their passport changes.

Nalini S Mahadevan, Esq

314-932-7111/314-402-2024 office   nsm@mlolaw.us   www.mlolaw.us

Disclaimer: Information here is not legal advice and does not constitute a client attorney relationship.

 

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US Immigration does not need passport photos for naturalization.

USCIS has updated their naturalization procedures.

All applicants (except those who reside overseas): · No longer need to submit two passport-style photographs.

No Photos Needed

USCIS will capture their photographs when they appear at the Application Support Center (ASC) for their biometrics appointment. Applicnts will be scheduled for a biometric service appointment at a local ASC for collection of their fingerprints, photographs and signature, regardless of their age.

If you are over 75

USCIS used to waive the fingerprint requirement for applicants 75 years or older, which meant they were not required to appear at an ASC. However, now that this form is processed electronically, those applicants do need to appear at an ASC. USICS improved technology means they can capture fingerprints for applicants of all ages. This enhances their ability to confirm your identity and perform required background checks. Applicants aged 75 and older do not have to pay the biometrics fee.

Handicapped or Disabled?

USCIS can make special arrangements to accommodate the needs of the elderly and applicants with disabilities, who are homebound or hospitalized. This is known as homebound processing. Applicants who need to request an accommodation for their appointment can submit a service request online or call the National Customer Service Center (NCSC) at any time at 800-375-5283 (TDD: 800-767-1833).

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA

7730 Carondelet Ave, Suite 110, Clayton, MO 63105

314-932-7111 or 314-374-8784

Disclaimer: This information here is not meant to create an attorney client relationship, nor is this legal advice.

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Students at at UNNJ lose their visa!

ICE cancels F-1 Student visas

On April 4 and 5, 2016, the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) terminated the visa of nonimmigrant students who had enrolled at the University of Northern New Jersey (UNNJ), and the visas of nonimmigrant students who had transferred from UNNJ.

Why?

The students were found to have knowingly participated in visa fraud because they enrolled at UNNJ to obtain an illegal to maintain their F-1 nonimmigrant status.

UNNJ is a school operated by Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Newark. It was created as a part of an enforcement action that targeted SEVP-certified schools and officials who sought to fraudulently utilize SEVP and the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) to commit various violations of federal law.

There are approximately 60 students who are affected and who will receive notification of cancellation of their visa.

Students who are terminated because they were currently  or  enrolled before at UNNJ and choose not to file for reinstatement or have applied to USCIS for reinstatement and whose application is denied, must depart the country immediately.

Not Eligible for Transfer

These students are not eligible for to transfer to another SEVP-certified school unless U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) approves the student for reinstatement following the student’s termination. Students who transferred to another school from UNNJ will also be terminated and their new school will be notified of the cancellation of their visa.

What to do now?

Call SEVP Response Center at 703-603-3400. This number is staffed from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (ET), Monday through Friday, except holidays. The SEVP Response Center is closed every Wednesday from 12:45 to 1:30 p.m. ET for system maintenance and testing.

Provide the following information when calling:

  • First and last name
  • SEVIS ID number
  • Address
  • Telephone number where you can be reached
  • E-mail address
  • Current SEVP-certified school

Nalini Mahadevan JD, MBA

Attorney at Law

314-932-7111 office

nsm@mlolaw.us

website: Mlolaw.us

Disclaimer:  Not meant as legal advice. NOT meant to create an attorney client relationship.  Please call an attorney to obtain advice pertaining to your legal situation.

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Is Your Driver’s License valid for Flying?

Starting Jan 10, 2016, TSA will no longer accept MO DL as valid photo ID to board a commercial craft at an airport.  There are 8 other states which are in the same boat!  

  • Alaska
  • California
  • Illinois
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • South Carolina
  • Washington state
  • Puerto Rico
  • Guam
  • the U.S. Virgin Islands
In response to TSA’s announcement, the Federal Courts in Missouri announced that a MO DL is still valid ID as far as they are concerned!
Many US born citizens living in MO and other states, may not have alternate Photo ID such as a US Passport, to present. US Passports are expensive for most persons to obtain. Military identification can be presented as valid ID to TSA. Immigrants in general have their passports to present as photo ID to TSA.
 
Here is what the DHS had to say:
“The Department of Homeland Security is working with state officials to ensure their compliance with REAL ID Act standards and to grant a state an extension where warranted. Missouri has not yet provided adequate justification to receive an extension on compliance with the requirements of the REAL ID Act passed by Congress in 2005. As of October 10, 2015, federal agencies may only accept driver’s licenses and identification cards issued by states that are compliant with the REAL ID Act or have an extension for accessing most federal facilities (including military bases) and entering nuclear power plants. Starting on January 10, 2016, driver’s licenses and identification cards issued by Missouri will not be accepted for these purposes. Missouri residents visiting a federal facility can provide another form of identification or follow procedures that the facility allows for persons without acceptable identification.”
 
“Missouri can request an extension at any time if there are new developments or additional relevant information regarding the steps they are taking to comply with the REAL ID Act requirements.”
 
“The Transportation Security Administration continues to accept all state-issued driver’s licenses and identification cards, including those from Missouri. DHS is in the process of scheduling plans for REAL ID enforcement at airports and will ensure that the traveling public has ample notice, at least 120 days, before any changes are made that might affect their travel. The REAL ID Act places the responsibility for action on the state to provide state-issued identification that meets the Act’s security standards.”
 
Nalini S. Mahadevan, Esq
nsm@mlolaw.us  Tel: 314.932.7111 (office) 314.374.8784 (mobile)
7730 Carondelet Ave, Suite 110, Clayton MO 63105
Disclaimer: Information contained here is not meant as legal advice nor does it create a client-attorney relationship.  A choice of a lawyer should not be based on advertising alone.

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CBP Allows Domestic Partnerships and Blended Families to File a Single Customs Declaration

On 12/13/2013, the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) broadened the definition of “members of a family residing in one household” to include long-term same-sex couples and other domestic relationships, a departure from the usual practice of a ‘family’ file multiple forms for each member, creating extra paperwork and a waste of processing time on entry to the US.

The rule will become effective on January 17th, 2014 after the holidays. The rule applies to both returning US citizens, US residents and international visitors who can now file a joint customs declaration for items purchased or brought from overseas.

CBP expects this process streamlining to save up to $2.8 million annually in personnel time.

New Definition of Domestic Relationships

“Domestic relationship” would be defined to include:

  • Foster children, stepchildren, half-siblings, legal wards, other dependents, and individuals with an in loco parentis or guardianship relationship with the children.
  • Two adults who are in a committed relationship including, but not limited to, long-term companions and couples in civil unions or domestic partnerships where the partners are financially interdependent, and are not married to, or a partner of, anyone else.

“Domestic relationship” excludes roommates or other cohabitants who do not meet the above definition.

“Members of a family residing in one household” will continue to include relationships of blood, adoption and marriage.

What This Change Will Mean to Travelers

For US Citizens and Residents

  • Under the new definition of domestic relationship, one combined family declaration can be presented to the CBP officer upon arrival.
  • For returning U.S. residents to be considered members of a family and group their exemption from customs duty and internal revenue tax, individuals must have lived in one household at their last permanent residence and intend to live together in one household in the U.S.
  • As with any joint declaration, verbal or written, the person making and/or signing the declaration will be held accountable for its validity.
  • If family members are U.S. residents, regulations allow them a personal duty exemption of up to $800 per individual and up to $1,600 per family.

For International Visitors

  • Under the new definition of domestic relationship, one combined family declaration can be presented to the CBP officer upon arrival.
  • For visitors to the U.S., regulations allow them certain exemptions (gifts, tobacco, personal effects, etc,), and they will be able to file a single family declaration, but they do not have the same personal duty exemption of $800 (individual) and $1,600 (members of a family) allowed to returning U.S. residents. As with any joint declaration, verbal or written, the person making and/or signing the declaration will be held accountable for its validity.

The Takeaway

Families are now redefined to include domestic partnerships, civil unions, unmarried persons living together, couples in same sex relationships and their biological, adopted and foster children. Families must reside together and continue to reside in the same home after they return to the US. There must be a financial relationship between the couple, which could mean a joint tax return or other means of sharing the financial burden of their home.

See also:
DOMA Issues After the Passage of “US v. Windsor”
USCIS releases FAQ on Immigration Benefits for Same Sex Marriages

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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A Second Look at Comprehensive Immigration Reform

In February, I wrote about why comprehensive immigration reform has a chance to pass this year; now, it’s time to discuss how immigration reform can strengthen the US as a whole.

Immigration reform has heavy bipartisan support, spearheaded by President Obama and Republican Sen. Marco Rubio (FL). Sen. Rubio is a member of the “Gang of Eight”, the four Democrat and four Republican Senators who have introduced new immigration legislation to Congress — Rubio has also assumed the role of spokesperson for the pending bill in the Senate. The House is also sponsoring several other bills on immigration.

There are security and economic reasons for the US to reform its immigration policy, both of which will have a major impact on the US economy.

The Security Side and the Impact on Employers

Immigration reform is not going to happen without enhanced border security and metrics to measure the levels of security reached. Another measure of security to guarantee a legal workforce is to make both E-verify and Form I-9 compliance mandatory for all employers.  Senate has already earmarked $110 million dollars to these programs — employers should see new compliance regulations soon after a new immigration bill has passed.

In addition, electronic checking of departures by CBP will ensure that non-immigrants depart on the date their authorized stay expires, according to their Form I-94 record. Departures are currently recorded with a paper I-94, which is surrendered upon exiting the US. The new electronic I-94 will record departures from passenger manifests issued by airlines. Entries are currently recorded, but exits from the US are not recorded uniformly at all ports. In addition, the new bill will mandate that all passports be electronically read, which would reduce human error.

It is a misconception that highly skilled visa holders somehow depress US wages. On the contrary, where certain technical skills are in short supply, employers pay top dollar wages for visa holders and high fees to the federal government, as well as jump through legal hurdles to employ these workers. The cost of employing a foreign worker is more expensive than a domestic worker.

The Economic Side

Granting legal status to more immigrants will relieve our labor shortages in both high-skill and low-skill arenas. The educational background of native-born Americans typically includes high school and college education — few are without high school diplomas, and hardly any have Ph.D.s in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM). The educational background of immigrants, on the other hand, is quite different: while many lack high school education, others hold Ph.D.s in STEM fields.

Most of the debate on immigration reform has focused on giving legal status to undocumented immigrants, upon the condition that they pay fees and back taxes. This will certainly have positive effects on our economy; however, we have more to gain from immigrants, both young and old, who, after gaining legal status, decide to further their careers in the US. Once these immigrants feel reassured about their future in the US, they will be more willing to invest in their careers.

One of our current problems is that many skill workers have trouble gaining a foothold onto the path to citizenship. Foreign entrepreneurs and technologists who study in the US are often denied works visas and return to their home country to find success. This issue is both stunting economic growth and causing a brain drain in America.

The number of available temporary visas is rarely revised and is still dependent upon caps and quotas. Our economic conditions have not been taken into consideration. Increasing visas both for high skilled workers, and lower skilled entrants in agriculture and forestry, could have a positive effect on wages and reduce the number of illegal entrants and overstays.

Immigrants also bolster our productivity growth. According to the Wall Street Journal, foreign scientists and engineers, who came to the US with an H1B visa, contributed 10-20% of the yearly productivity growth in the US from 1990-2010. Attracting innovators to our country will undoubtedly create more jobs, as more innovation means more labs, universities and companies doing research. Yet, the US’s H1B visa program only creates 65,000 visas per year for highly skilled workers. That amount has proved to be insufficient, as H1B visas quotas fill very quickly as in the last cap.

There are clear economic and security needs for streamlined and comprehensive immigration reform, and lawmakers and politicians must take action. Congress is set to vote on immigration reform before the July 4 congressional recess.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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The New and Improved I-9 Form

On March 8, 2013, USCIS published a new Form I-9 for employers to use for new hires, which is for immediate use. USCIS received over 6,000 comments on the form and has tried to incorporate some of the suggestions. To ensure that the correct form is being used, look for the form’s date in the lower right-hand corner of the form.

When Should Employers Use the New I-9

The new form is to be used for all new hires. The 3 day rule remains, which is to fill Section 1 within 3 days of starting work. The form can also be filled in advance, as long as an offer of employment has been made and accepted. If the old form was used and the employee has not started work, a new form should be used in lieu of the old form.

The new form should be used for both US citizens and non-citizens, if they are working within the geographical boundaries of the United States of America. If a new office or an employee is hired in Mexico or Canada, there is no obligation to maintain a Form I-9 for the new hire. Employers should use the new Forms I-9 from 8 March, 2013 onwards. Older forms dated 02/02/2009 and 08/07/2009 can be used until May 7th, 2013.

The Spanish version can be filled out by new hires only in Puerto Rico. On the mainland, the Spanish version can be utilized as a translation tool for Spanish speaking new hires, but only an English language version Form I-9 can be filled out by both the employer and employee and retained by the employer.

The New Form

The new form is 7 pages of instruction and two pages of form to be filled. Section 1 occupies its own page, with expanded areas for the employee to fill personal identifying information. The expanded area allows work-authorized non-citizens to complete their information.

Page 2 of the form is divided between Section 2 and 3. Section 2 is renamed to include authorized representative review and Section 3 is now called “Reverification and Rehires”, instead of “Updating and Reverification”. Section 3 is to be used for employees who return to work after an absence of time. Once the initial I-9 is filled out by the employee, the employer cannot ask legal permanent residents or US citizens to present new documents to complete reverification for work authorization.

The Takeaway

The form is more detailed and thus, may have more pitfalls. Print the new form on both sides of the paper to keep both pages together. The 67 page book of “Instructions” is now called “Guidance”. The important step is to start using the new form and to cease using the old form. Section 1 cannot be populated by electronic programs used to ‘onboard’ new hires. Employer liability, audits and monetary fines remain the same under the old and new forms.

We are available to discuss the new form or needs for training and assistance.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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OSC Document Abuse Settlements

The Errors that Employers Commit

Some hiring mistakes end up costing employers a lot of money and time, and loss of reputation. This past October, the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) arrived at an agreement with the New Jersey-based home healthcare provider, Advantage Home Care, LLC, which was charged for violating the anti-discrimination provision of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). Advantage Home Care was asking new hires, who were lawful permanent residents, to present additional and different documents during the Form I-9 employment eligibility verification process.

The claim was brought to OSC by an individual who applied for a job. When the individual applied to Advantage Home Care, the company ran a criminal background check and wrongly determined that the individual was using an invalid Social Security number (SSN). The individual went to the Social Security Administration, which concluded that the SSN was valid; however, Advantage Home Care would not employ the applicant. Upon further investigation, OSC found that Advantage Home Care required lawful permanent residents to provide more documents to validate work authorization than US citizens. The INA prohibits such discrimination.

In early October, similar charges were brought upon Las Vegas-based Tuscany Hotel and Casino, LLC. The company was also found to be using discriminatory practices during the employment eligibility verification and re-verification processes.

A complaint was filed with OSC in May 2012, asserting that Tuscany was asking non-citizen job applicants to provide additional or different documents during the work authorization process; US Citizen applicants were not asked to present more documents. Once hired, and in order to remain employed, the company then asked non-citizen employees to provide further document requests during the re-verification process. Moreover, non-citizen employees were subject to severe reviews, which US citizen employees didn’t have to endure.

Expensive Mistakes for Employers

Per OSC’s agreement with Advantage Home Care, the company will pay $1,633 to the individual and $46,575 in civil penalties to the US. Advantage Home Care must also pay back pay to previous job applicants who suffered financially from the company’s policy. Additionally, the company’s human resources staff will be trained in employers’ responsibilities and best practices to prevent discrimination during the employment eligibility verification process. In order to ensure compliance, Advantage Home Care’s staff will also be monitored by OSC for three years.

Under the agreement, Tuscany will pay $49,000 in civil penalties to the US and make payments to the complainant. Tuscany will administer new employment eligibility verification policies and practices that will eradicate any employment-based discrimination. Additionally, the company will train its staff on how best to avoid discrimination in the verification process, and will be monitored for compliance.

Lessons Learnt

Employers must train HR personnel on the proper documentation methods for ‘onboarding’ employees. In addition to training, written guidance or manuals for proper intake are necessary to avoid financial penalties, and work stoppage due to worksite audit. Losses may occur because workers are redirected to answering the government, providing requested documents and undergoing mandatory training as part of the worksite enforcement action. An employer’s reputation can suffer because the audit and fines are reported on government and public websites, and news media. Employers can use an immigration attorney to prevent these costly mistakes.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

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Justice Department Finds Practices of Discriminatory Policing in North Carolina

The Justice Department found that the Alamance County Sheriff’s Office (ACSO) in North Carolina operates in a practice of discriminatory policing, specifically targeting Latinos.

Policing Practices in Violation of the Constitution and Federal Law

By using methods that discriminate against Latinos, ACSO has violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment; the Fourth Amendment; the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act; and Title VI. ACSO’s modes of discriminatory policing are as follows:

  • ACSO deputies target Latino drivers for traffic stops;
  • A study of ACSO’s traffic stops on three major county roadways found that deputies were between four and 10 times more likely to stop Latino drivers than non-Latino drivers;
  • ACSO deputies routinely locate checkpoints just outside Latino neighborhoods, forcing residents to endure police checks when entering or leaving their communities;
  • ACSO practices at vehicle checkpoints often vary based on a driver’s ethnicity.   Deputies insist on examining identification of Latino drivers, while allowing drivers of other ethnicities to pass through without showing identification;
  • ACSO deputies arrest Latinos for minor traffic violations, while issuing citations or warnings to non-Latinos for the same violations;
  • ACSO uses jail booking and detention practices, including practices related to immigration status checks, that discriminate against Latinos;
  • The sheriff and ACSO’s leadership explicitly instruct deputies to target Latinos with discriminatory traffic stops and other enforcement activities;
  • The sheriff and ACSO leadership foster a culture of bias by using anti-Latino epithets; and
  • ACSO engages in substandard reporting and monitoring practices that mask its discriminatory conduct. (source)

Policing Reforms

The Justice Department’s inquiry allowed for a thorough investigation, comprising of a detailed analysis of ACSO policies, procedures, training materials and records on traffic stops, arrests, citations, vehicle checkpoints and other archived evidence. For the inquiry, the Justice Department also interviewed former ACSO employees and Alamance County residents.

In order to reform ACSO’s discriminatory policing, the police department must accept structural and fundamental change by creating and employing new policies, procedures, and training so as to promote constitutional policing. ACSO must also be held accountable for their actions, and guarantee the Justice Department that any unlawful bias has been eradicated. The Justice Department will request a court-enforced, written document that will help to solve ACSO’s violations.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

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New PERM Issues for Employers – Interviewing US applicants

Consider these facts: ABC company has a valuable employee for whom they have filed a PERM application with the Department of Labor. The job requirements are a Master’s degree with a very specific set of skills.

Select International Inc.

In the matter of Select International, Inc., a decision issued by Board of Alien Labor Certification Appeals (BALCA) on 19 September 2012, the board held that if a US worker submits a broad resume in response to an advertisement for a job opening, the employer must not only review the application, but must also provide in-depth reasoning as to why the US worker does not meet the minimum experience requirements for the job advertised.

Select International advertised a position for an industrial/organizational psychologist. The company stated that they would accept any suitable combination of experience, training and education (Kellogg language). Resumes from three potentially qualified applicants were rejected for not meeting the employer’s minimum requirements. Select International did not interview the applicants or send letters of rejection. The employer in particular rejected Avi Avigdor, a US worker who applied for the job opportunity. BALCA denied labor certification because no further consideration was given to his resume beyond a review.

To conduct a recruitment in good faith, an employer “must take steps to ensure that it has lawful job related reasons for rejecting US applicants, and not stop short of fully investigating an applicants qualifications” (E. Tenn. State Univ.). No US worker should be rejected for lacking the skills necessary to perform the duties involved if they are capable of acquiring the skills during a reasonable period of job training, and there is no lawful job-related reason for rejecting the US worker.

Select International stated that the job opportunity was for a person with a masters degree in industrial/organizational psychology and required 36 months of experience, and that coursework must include personnel selection; employment law; legal issues related thereto; candidate testing and selection; job analysis; development of job candidate selection tools; and advanced statistical analysis using statistical methodologies. Select International also state in Form 9089 that it would accept any suitable combination of education, training or experience.

The job required development of new assessment tools and techniques; in-depth statistical analysis; detailed reports; and recommendations. Select International stated that Mr. Avigdor did not meet minimum experience requirements because his 47 months of experience was not related to the job duties to be performed in the  position offered. The company also noted that none of the positions held by Mr. Avigdor involved skills listed on the PERM application, nor did he have the experience to perform the core duties required by the job. Therefore, he did not have the combination of educational training and experience to qualify for the position.

The PERM certification was denied on the basis that Mr. Avigdor’s credentials were not investigated fully.

What is an employer to do?

Given the facts of this case, perhaps the best course of action for an employer is to interview all suitable applicants and to document job-related reasons for rejection. Kellogg language should be used sparingly on PERM applications, unless employers are willing to accept any suitable combination of education, training and experience from US job applicants with broad resumes.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

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