10 Reasons For A New OCI Card

 

 

1.  When you are issued a new passport.2. If you are younger than 21, OCI documents must be re-issued each time you get a new passport.

3. If you are are 50 years of age or older, OCI documents must be re-issued once after the issuance of a new passport.

4. If your OCI card was issued for the first time after you were 50,  then you do not need a new OCI card.

5. If you are between the ages of 21 to 49 years of age, there is no need to re-issue OCI documents each time you are issued a new passport.  But you can request the consulate to re-issue the OCI documents with the new passport number.

6. You need a new OCI if there is a change in personal particulars.

7. You need a new OCI if you lose or your OCI documents are damaged.

8. You need a new OCI if you made a mistake in your personal particulars while filing the application online.

9. You need a new OCI if you change your address or occupation.

10. It is less expensive to apply for a new visa for your minor children born in the United States, than to re-apply each time their passport changes.

Nalini S Mahadevan, Esq

314-932-7111/314-402-2024 office   nsm@mlolaw.us   www.mlolaw.us

Disclaimer: Information here is not legal advice and does not constitute a client attorney relationship.

 

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Pointers for Corporate Executives Applying for U.S. Citizenship

Are you a globetrotting corporate executive, here in the America one day and the next in China or Europe?

Do you have permanent residency in America?

If you answered in the affirmative, then we need to talk and plan.

Plan your stay in the U.S. and travel outside the country, so that you have at least 6 months during a calendar year in the U.S.

If there is a possibility of being transferred overseas to another country for a new job with your American company, file an application to preserve U.S. residency.

Join Global Entry to bypass long lines at international and domestic airports.

Lastly, don’t forget your family.  Update their green cards if they were issued when the children were little.  That may avoid an unpleasant interview when they enter the U.S.   Apply for re-entry permits for your family if they plan on staying overseas for a year or more while you travel.

Nalini Mahadevan, JD, MBA   Attorney, MLO Law LLC

www.mlolaw.us      nsm@mlolaw.us    314.932.7111

Of course this is not meant as legal advice, but information shared in the expectation it may help employers, employees and their representatives.

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Is Your Driver’s License valid for Flying?

Starting Jan 10, 2016, TSA will no longer accept MO DL as valid photo ID to board a commercial craft at an airport.  There are 8 other states which are in the same boat!  

  • Alaska
  • California
  • Illinois
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • South Carolina
  • Washington state
  • Puerto Rico
  • Guam
  • the U.S. Virgin Islands
In response to TSA’s announcement, the Federal Courts in Missouri announced that a MO DL is still valid ID as far as they are concerned!
Many US born citizens living in MO and other states, may not have alternate Photo ID such as a US Passport, to present. US Passports are expensive for most persons to obtain. Military identification can be presented as valid ID to TSA. Immigrants in general have their passports to present as photo ID to TSA.
 
Here is what the DHS had to say:
“The Department of Homeland Security is working with state officials to ensure their compliance with REAL ID Act standards and to grant a state an extension where warranted. Missouri has not yet provided adequate justification to receive an extension on compliance with the requirements of the REAL ID Act passed by Congress in 2005. As of October 10, 2015, federal agencies may only accept driver’s licenses and identification cards issued by states that are compliant with the REAL ID Act or have an extension for accessing most federal facilities (including military bases) and entering nuclear power plants. Starting on January 10, 2016, driver’s licenses and identification cards issued by Missouri will not be accepted for these purposes. Missouri residents visiting a federal facility can provide another form of identification or follow procedures that the facility allows for persons without acceptable identification.”
 
“Missouri can request an extension at any time if there are new developments or additional relevant information regarding the steps they are taking to comply with the REAL ID Act requirements.”
 
“The Transportation Security Administration continues to accept all state-issued driver’s licenses and identification cards, including those from Missouri. DHS is in the process of scheduling plans for REAL ID enforcement at airports and will ensure that the traveling public has ample notice, at least 120 days, before any changes are made that might affect their travel. The REAL ID Act places the responsibility for action on the state to provide state-issued identification that meets the Act’s security standards.”
 
Nalini S. Mahadevan, Esq
nsm@mlolaw.us  Tel: 314.932.7111 (office) 314.374.8784 (mobile)
7730 Carondelet Ave, Suite 110, Clayton MO 63105
Disclaimer: Information contained here is not meant as legal advice nor does it create a client-attorney relationship.  A choice of a lawyer should not be based on advertising alone.

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I Lost My Indian Passport — Help!

Recently, I have been getting referrals from clients about losing their passport from India. Now, losing an Indian passport is a greater deal than losing your US Passport, because there is an established procedure for recovery and reissue of a US Passport.

But recovery and reissue of an Indian Passport is another matter.

The fear of clients who contact me is that they will be turned into either ICE or USCIS because they are out of service. The good news is that there is now a procedure to reapply for a lost passport. However, it is complex.

In my experience, there is a better procedure if your application is filed as a walk-in rather than mailing in the application.

The next complexity is added because the Indian consulate does not update their website often. The result is that the information on the website is often unreliable or out of date. If my client is traveling from outside the consulate area, then I suggest planning the trip in advance to allow for contingencies, such as insufficient paperwork.

Contact us for further information.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney St. Louis, Missouri
nsm@mlolaw.us

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The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

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Pre-Adoption Visitation Requirement Changed to One Parent from Two

Only One Parent Required to Travel to Adopt

This past January, President Obama authorized the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014, which redefines the term “orphan” to fall under the definition of “child” found in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

Moreover—since signing the new act into law—for adoptions that don’t fall under the purview of the Hague Adoption Convention, it isn’t necessary for both parents to travel before or during the adoption if an adopted child is going to enter the US on an IR-3 visa, which according to INA, allows for automatic US citizenship upon entrance.

Before the new legislation, in order for an adopted child to receive an IR-3 visa, both parents would have to travel to meet the child during the adoption. If only one parent travelled, then the child would enter on an IR-4 visa, and the other parent would need to re-adopt the child in the US for him/her to gain US citizenship. This process became costly and caused delays in the child securing all the benefits of US citizenship.

Revised Forms

USCIS is currently revising the orphan adoption forms, Forms I-600A and I-600. The new versions will likely include the new definition of “orphan”.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney St. Louis, Missouri

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The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan
Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

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CBP Allows Domestic Partnerships and Blended Families to File a Single Customs Declaration

On 12/13/2013, the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) broadened the definition of “members of a family residing in one household” to include long-term same-sex couples and other domestic relationships, a departure from the usual practice of a ‘family’ file multiple forms for each member, creating extra paperwork and a waste of processing time on entry to the US.

The rule will become effective on January 17th, 2014 after the holidays. The rule applies to both returning US citizens, US residents and international visitors who can now file a joint customs declaration for items purchased or brought from overseas.

CBP expects this process streamlining to save up to $2.8 million annually in personnel time.

New Definition of Domestic Relationships

“Domestic relationship” would be defined to include:

  • Foster children, stepchildren, half-siblings, legal wards, other dependents, and individuals with an in loco parentis or guardianship relationship with the children.
  • Two adults who are in a committed relationship including, but not limited to, long-term companions and couples in civil unions or domestic partnerships where the partners are financially interdependent, and are not married to, or a partner of, anyone else.

“Domestic relationship” excludes roommates or other cohabitants who do not meet the above definition.

“Members of a family residing in one household” will continue to include relationships of blood, adoption and marriage.

What This Change Will Mean to Travelers

For US Citizens and Residents

  • Under the new definition of domestic relationship, one combined family declaration can be presented to the CBP officer upon arrival.
  • For returning U.S. residents to be considered members of a family and group their exemption from customs duty and internal revenue tax, individuals must have lived in one household at their last permanent residence and intend to live together in one household in the U.S.
  • As with any joint declaration, verbal or written, the person making and/or signing the declaration will be held accountable for its validity.
  • If family members are U.S. residents, regulations allow them a personal duty exemption of up to $800 per individual and up to $1,600 per family.

For International Visitors

  • Under the new definition of domestic relationship, one combined family declaration can be presented to the CBP officer upon arrival.
  • For visitors to the U.S., regulations allow them certain exemptions (gifts, tobacco, personal effects, etc,), and they will be able to file a single family declaration, but they do not have the same personal duty exemption of $800 (individual) and $1,600 (members of a family) allowed to returning U.S. residents. As with any joint declaration, verbal or written, the person making and/or signing the declaration will be held accountable for its validity.

The Takeaway

Families are now redefined to include domestic partnerships, civil unions, unmarried persons living together, couples in same sex relationships and their biological, adopted and foster children. Families must reside together and continue to reside in the same home after they return to the US. There must be a financial relationship between the couple, which could mean a joint tax return or other means of sharing the financial burden of their home.

See also:
DOMA Issues After the Passage of “US v. Windsor”
USCIS releases FAQ on Immigration Benefits for Same Sex Marriages

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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Why Is I-94 so important?

Form I-94 and its Uses

This piece of paper that measures 4×5 inches is how a non-immigrant visa (NIV) holder proves that he or she has exited the country. Clients often call us because they were told when they re-entered the US that they did not surrender their Form I-94 on exit. The paper is also very important to international students because it shows that they are here for the duration of the status of their visa — i.e. they do not have to exit until their program is over, and this stay could, under the right circumstances, exceed the length of their stamped visa. The I-94 is also used for Form I-9 purposes, to record the foreign passport, visa and I-94 number, and serves as a List A document for purposes of worker identity and work authorization. No other document needs to be produced by the worker as eligibility to work, which protects both the employer and employee.

Now with the electronic I-94, the apple cart has been tipped! Years of procedure and practice are to be replaced by a new process that State DMVs, federal agencies and employers need to learn. Software has to be amended to accept electronic I-94 cards.  The good news is that a duplicate I-94 can be printed as long as the NIV is in the US; the I-94 record disappears as soon as the NIV exits the US.

Form I-102 should still be used to correct mistakes in the record (filing fee $330); however, US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) should be contacted in case of mistakes in the I-94 passport stamp. If CBP issued you Form I-94, I-94W, or I-95 with incorrect information (ex: misspelled name, incorrect date of birth, visa classification or date of admission), you should not file Form I-102. You will need to go in person to the nearest CBP port of entry (POE), or the nearest CBP deferred inspection office (DIO), to have the information corrected. For locations and hours of operation, visit CBP’s website at www.cbp.gov.

If you would like more information, please read my overview of electronic I-94.

More resources:
FAQ on what to enter to retrieve an I-94
How to obtain a copy of the new I-94
ICE I-94 Fact Sheet

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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CBP Announces Electronic Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record

Form I-94 is the main way in which persons who are not US citizens, and who are not legal permanent residents, demonstrate their legal entry into the US. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) have announced the digital automation of Form I-94 Arrival/Departure, which will standardize travelers’ arrival and inspection processes, and ultimately lower costs and travelers’ wait time. Currently, CBP does not have a fail-safe method of keeping track of non-immigrant departures — an electronic I-94 could eliminate this loophole.

In late March, CBP published an interim final rule to the Federal Register, which redefines the definition of Form I-94 to include the electronic format and will be effective on April 26, 2013. Non-immigrants, who enter the US by air or sea will not have to submit paper Forms I-94.  But those who are subject to secondary inspection and asylees, refugees and parolees, will be required have to submit a paper form given to them by a Customs and Border Patrol officer. Travelers who enter through land border ports of entry will receive paper versions of Form I-94.

CBP will maintain I-94 records for all travelers who require one, but all records will instead be entered into the system in an electronic format and not given to the traveler. CBP will scan the traveler’s passport, creating an electronic arrival record for that person. Travelers will receive a CBP admission stamp on their travel documents, which detail the date and class of admission, and the admitted-until date. Departures will also be recorded electronically — if the traveler has a paper I-94, then he/she must surrender it upon leaving the US.

Some agencies will require a paper copy of Form I-94. USCIS will ask applicants to fill out paper copies when requesting particular benefits; and the State Department of Motor Vehicles (DMVs) will ask for paper copy submissions. In addition, non-immigrants with work authorization can present paper copies of Form I-94 to their employers during the Form I-9 process. If a traveler needs a paper copy of Form I-94, it will be available at www.cbp.gov/I94.

The Takeaway

Since this program is very new, we can expect confusion from all corners for a while, and differences in enforcement and paper documentation requirements from agencies. If you are a non-citizen, who is not a permanent resident, you will not receive a paper I-94 form from CBP as you enter the US, if you come by air or by sea. You will continue to receive a paper I-94 if you come by land from Canada or Mexico, if you require a secondary inspection, or you are a refugee or asylee. The problem is that USCIS and individual state-run agencies, such as drivers licence bureaus, will continue to require the now defunct I-94 form. In addition, it will become important to log onto the CBP website to ascertain that all your details on the electronic record are correct, and to print out a copy for your non-immigrant record. The electronic record will be erased from the system on departure from the US — maintaining a paper copy to prove departure may be useful under these new circumstances.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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