Massachusetts’ Immigrant Program for Students

Massachusetts has created a loophole program, called Global Entrepreneur in Residence (GER), to permit foreign students to stay legally in the US.

Foreign students who attended college in Massachusetts and who want to pursue entrepreneurial activities in the state can apply to the GER Program, which is being run by the Massachusetts Tech Collaborative, an independent state agency designed to promote the advancement of technology in the state. Chosen individuals will be given a job at a participating universities in Massachusetts—the students will work part-time and will submit visa applications sponsored by the university. The program is expected to grow 46,000 jobs for students.

US immigration law dictates that foreign students can study at US colleges and universities under a student visa—after they graduate, their visas expire and they have to find a US employer to sponsor them for an H-1B visa. The H-1B visa system inherently poses a disadvantage for entrepreneurs, the system only allows for a once-per-year application process—in the form of a lottery—and the slots fill up quickly. On April 7, 2014, USCIS reported that it had secured its quota of 85,000 H-1B visa petitions only five days after it began receiving applications.

This is why the GER Program’s loophole is important: colleges and universities are immune to the cap and can submit applications for employers at any time. This means foreign graduates have a higher chance of obtaining a visa through the GER Program, and through employment with higher-education institutions, because these institutions are exempt from the cap.

The House bill proposed to devise a new category of startup visas for foreign entrepreneurs, while also raising the amount of H-1B visas accessible to immigrants with advanced degrees. While the Massachusetts program is yet to be funded, this is a great start for foreign graduates whom the US needs to retain!

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney St. Louis, Missouri
nsm@mlolaw.us

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The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

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Special Immigrant Status for Iraqi Nationals

The US government passed Public Law 110-181, which will permit Iraqi nationals, who assisted and were employed by the US government in Iraq for one year and can prove it (i.e. have evidence of their employment), to apply for an immigrant visa to the US.

Yesterday, USCIS announced that Congress has passed a bill extending the Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) program for Iraqi nationals who worked for, or on behalf of, the US government. The President signed the extended bill into law on Oct. 4, 2013.

This program covers Iraqi nationals who — during the period between March 20, 2003 and Sept. 30, 2013 — were employed by, or on behalf of, the US government in Iraq for a period of at least one year. It was created by section 1244 of Public Law 110-181, as amended by Public Law 110-242. The program had expired with respect to principal applicants on Sept. 30, 2013, but has now been extended.

The extension permits USCIS to approve petitions or applications for visas, or adjustment of status to lawful permanent resident in any Iraqi SIV case under section 1244, which were pending with USCIS or with the Department of State (DOS) when the program expired on Sept. 30, 2013. USCIS may also approve an additional 2,000 cases, as long as the initial applications to the DOS Chief-of-Mission in Iraq are made by Dec. 31, 2013.

Spouses and children of principal Iraqi SIVs are also eligible for SIV status. They can continue to make applications, and there is no numerical quota for the number of visas that can be issued to spouses and children of SIV.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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Do you have to pay Estate Tax in 2010?

Since 2000 I have heard the mantra over and over again, ‘if you die in 2010 you don’t have to pay estate tax. Even Bill Gates does not have to!’ Well, the truth of the matter is that even if he, or for that matter ‘you’, died in 2010, your heirs may not pay estate tax, but they may be liable to pay a tax on the difference between what you paid for the asset and the sale price of the asset. In layman’s terms, if grandma bought a house for $40,000, died in 2010, and you inherited the house and sold it for $100,000, then you owed the government taxes on the difference of $60,000. So in lieu of an estate tax, there is a ‘carryover basis’ of valuing the asset at date of death. The reality is that there is a ‘step up in basis’ of $3.5 million that a surviving spouse can claim. So maybe there is no tax; but the problem is that the IRS has not set out any rules, issued any federal regulations or forms to cover the eventuality of dying in 2010. No one expected the inaction of Congress on the matter. So CPAs, estate planning lawyers and the IRS are left wringing their hands over the inaction. And more complications for residents of states that levy a state estate tax, that may have not been repealed along with the repeal of the federal tax. In Missouri, there is no estate tax. If you have property in Illinois, there is an estate tax on estate valuations over $2.0 million. So farmland may be affected or even real estate developers dying in 2010 who may owe no federal estate tax, but may owe Illinois estate tax. The irony of the matter is that a taxable estate of over $5 million would pay federal estate tax of $675,000 in 2009 and $1,653,400 in 2011, if Congress does not change the law. This affects farmers and other growers, small business persons; people who do not fit the ‘rich’ mold. But the larger the estate, the lower tax the estate would be liable to … estates of $50 million would pay $20.9 million in 2009 and less than $20 million in 2011, if the law is not changed! I don’t think that that is what was intended. So in 2011, the federal government will collect more federal revenue on inheritance money than it did in 2009. In 2011, the largest estates would pay less as a percentage of value. Warren Buffet must be smiling.

See you in my next post.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA

Attorney at Law

www.lawyersyoucantalkto.com

Copyright 2010.  All rights reserved.

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