Why Is I-94 so important?

Form I-94 and its Uses

This piece of paper that measures 4×5 inches is how a non-immigrant visa (NIV) holder proves that he or she has exited the country. Clients often call us because they were told when they re-entered the US that they did not surrender their Form I-94 on exit. The paper is also very important to international students because it shows that they are here for the duration of the status of their visa — i.e. they do not have to exit until their program is over, and this stay could, under the right circumstances, exceed the length of their stamped visa. The I-94 is also used for Form I-9 purposes, to record the foreign passport, visa and I-94 number, and serves as a List A document for purposes of worker identity and work authorization. No other document needs to be produced by the worker as eligibility to work, which protects both the employer and employee.

Now with the electronic I-94, the apple cart has been tipped! Years of procedure and practice are to be replaced by a new process that State DMVs, federal agencies and employers need to learn. Software has to be amended to accept electronic I-94 cards.  The good news is that a duplicate I-94 can be printed as long as the NIV is in the US; the I-94 record disappears as soon as the NIV exits the US.

Form I-102 should still be used to correct mistakes in the record (filing fee $330); however, US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) should be contacted in case of mistakes in the I-94 passport stamp. If CBP issued you Form I-94, I-94W, or I-95 with incorrect information (ex: misspelled name, incorrect date of birth, visa classification or date of admission), you should not file Form I-102. You will need to go in person to the nearest CBP port of entry (POE), or the nearest CBP deferred inspection office (DIO), to have the information corrected. For locations and hours of operation, visit CBP’s website at www.cbp.gov.

If you would like more information, please read my overview of electronic I-94.

More resources:
FAQ on what to enter to retrieve an I-94
How to obtain a copy of the new I-94
ICE I-94 Fact Sheet

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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CBP Announces Electronic Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record

Form I-94 is the main way in which persons who are not US citizens, and who are not legal permanent residents, demonstrate their legal entry into the US. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) have announced the digital automation of Form I-94 Arrival/Departure, which will standardize travelers’ arrival and inspection processes, and ultimately lower costs and travelers’ wait time. Currently, CBP does not have a fail-safe method of keeping track of non-immigrant departures — an electronic I-94 could eliminate this loophole.

In late March, CBP published an interim final rule to the Federal Register, which redefines the definition of Form I-94 to include the electronic format and will be effective on April 26, 2013. Non-immigrants, who enter the US by air or sea will not have to submit paper Forms I-94.  But those who are subject to secondary inspection and asylees, refugees and parolees, will be required have to submit a paper form given to them by a Customs and Border Patrol officer. Travelers who enter through land border ports of entry will receive paper versions of Form I-94.

CBP will maintain I-94 records for all travelers who require one, but all records will instead be entered into the system in an electronic format and not given to the traveler. CBP will scan the traveler’s passport, creating an electronic arrival record for that person. Travelers will receive a CBP admission stamp on their travel documents, which detail the date and class of admission, and the admitted-until date. Departures will also be recorded electronically — if the traveler has a paper I-94, then he/she must surrender it upon leaving the US.

Some agencies will require a paper copy of Form I-94. USCIS will ask applicants to fill out paper copies when requesting particular benefits; and the State Department of Motor Vehicles (DMVs) will ask for paper copy submissions. In addition, non-immigrants with work authorization can present paper copies of Form I-94 to their employers during the Form I-9 process. If a traveler needs a paper copy of Form I-94, it will be available at www.cbp.gov/I94.

The Takeaway

Since this program is very new, we can expect confusion from all corners for a while, and differences in enforcement and paper documentation requirements from agencies. If you are a non-citizen, who is not a permanent resident, you will not receive a paper I-94 form from CBP as you enter the US, if you come by air or by sea. You will continue to receive a paper I-94 if you come by land from Canada or Mexico, if you require a secondary inspection, or you are a refugee or asylee. The problem is that USCIS and individual state-run agencies, such as drivers licence bureaus, will continue to require the now defunct I-94 form. In addition, it will become important to log onto the CBP website to ascertain that all your details on the electronic record are correct, and to print out a copy for your non-immigrant record. The electronic record will be erased from the system on departure from the US — maintaining a paper copy to prove departure may be useful under these new circumstances.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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The New and Improved I-9 Form

On March 8, 2013, USCIS published a new Form I-9 for employers to use for new hires, which is for immediate use. USCIS received over 6,000 comments on the form and has tried to incorporate some of the suggestions. To ensure that the correct form is being used, look for the form’s date in the lower right-hand corner of the form.

When Should Employers Use the New I-9

The new form is to be used for all new hires. The 3 day rule remains, which is to fill Section 1 within 3 days of starting work. The form can also be filled in advance, as long as an offer of employment has been made and accepted. If the old form was used and the employee has not started work, a new form should be used in lieu of the old form.

The new form should be used for both US citizens and non-citizens, if they are working within the geographical boundaries of the United States of America. If a new office or an employee is hired in Mexico or Canada, there is no obligation to maintain a Form I-9 for the new hire. Employers should use the new Forms I-9 from 8 March, 2013 onwards. Older forms dated 02/02/2009 and 08/07/2009 can be used until May 7th, 2013.

The Spanish version can be filled out by new hires only in Puerto Rico. On the mainland, the Spanish version can be utilized as a translation tool for Spanish speaking new hires, but only an English language version Form I-9 can be filled out by both the employer and employee and retained by the employer.

The New Form

The new form is 7 pages of instruction and two pages of form to be filled. Section 1 occupies its own page, with expanded areas for the employee to fill personal identifying information. The expanded area allows work-authorized non-citizens to complete their information.

Page 2 of the form is divided between Section 2 and 3. Section 2 is renamed to include authorized representative review and Section 3 is now called “Reverification and Rehires”, instead of “Updating and Reverification”. Section 3 is to be used for employees who return to work after an absence of time. Once the initial I-9 is filled out by the employee, the employer cannot ask legal permanent residents or US citizens to present new documents to complete reverification for work authorization.

The Takeaway

The form is more detailed and thus, may have more pitfalls. Print the new form on both sides of the paper to keep both pages together. The 67 page book of “Instructions” is now called “Guidance”. The important step is to start using the new form and to cease using the old form. Section 1 cannot be populated by electronic programs used to ‘onboard’ new hires. Employer liability, audits and monetary fines remain the same under the old and new forms.

We are available to discuss the new form or needs for training and assistance.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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Negotiating I-9 Fines

In my previous blog, I wrote about OCAHO negotiating I-9 fines. To negotiate fines either with ICE or OCAHO, the employer must be willing to file a brief with OCAHO to request a hearing, and then ICE may be willing to ‘come to the table’.

Prior to the hearing, the employer and counsel must analyse each count against the company, either to accept or refute and prepare a brief accordingly. Both ICE and OCAHO consider the 5 factor test before negotiating a fine:

  1. The size of the employer’s business,
  2. The employer’s good faith,
  3. The severity of the violation(s),
  4. Whether individuals involved were unauthorized aliens, and
  5. A history of former violations by the employer.

Employers must be careful to tender only Forms I-9, which are for current employees, and refrain from tendering purged documents.

Methodical analysis of the NIF (Notice of Intent to Fine), counts and legal basis is a must in order to be ready to negotiate with ICE and, if necessary, to request a hearing from OCAHO.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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Recent I-9 Fines Reduced by OCAHO

Recently, the Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing Officer (OCAHO) has shown a trend of leniency towards companies that are found to be noncompliant with ICE‘s Form I-9 rules and regulations. ICE, on the other hand, isn’t always as forgiving as OCAHO, which can be expressly seen in ICE’s cases against March Construction, Inc., Forsch Polymer Corp., BKR Restaurants (DBA Burger King) and Barnett Taylor (DBA Burger King).

In order to determine a baseline fine for companies, ICE surveys five factors:

  1. The size of the employer‘s business,
  2. The employer’s good faith,
  3. The severity of the violation(s),
  4. Whether individuals involved were unauthorized aliens, and
  5. A history of former violations by the employer.

March Construction, Inc.

The construction company, March Construction, was found liable for a total of 103 violations after assessments made by both ICE and OCAHO. For March Construction, ICE determined a baseline fine of $770, but increased the baseline by 15% due to March Construction’s supposed lack of good faith, severity of violations and employment of undocumented workers. ICE requested $885.50 per violation for a total of $86,933.

OCAHO agreed with ICE on the severity of the violations, however found that ICE had no evidence that March Construction was actually employing undocumented workers. Also, the company’s ability to pay the fines is a major factor. OCAHO ultimately asked for a reduced sum of $17,120.

Forsch Polymer, Corp.

In June 2010, ICE issued a Notice of Inspection (NOI) to Forsch Polymer, asking for Forms 1-9 for all employees from the past year. The company sent ICE only 12 completed I-9s, and was consequently charged with 11 violations of the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA), among the violations were failing to properly complete an entire Form I-9 and certain sections of Form I-9. ICE requested a fine of $11,827.75.

However, OCAHO found ICE in error: OCAHO discovered that three of Forsch’s employees did not complete an I-9 within three days of being hired. OCAHO determined that this was the fault of ICE — ICE should have issued a notice and provided ample time for Forsch Polymer to correct these mistakes. OCAHO dismissed the allegations of the company’s failure to complete Forms I-9, but found ICE correct in finding fault with the employer for backdating several Forms I-9.

ICE sought a baseline fine of $935 per violation, aggravating the baseline penalties 5-15% for each violation due to the severity of violations, lack of good faith and employment of four unauthorized aliens. OCAHO ultimately asked for a reduced sum of $4,600.

Burger King

BKR Restaurants and Barnett Taylor both do business as Burger King restaurants, and were both issued NOIs on the same day in December 2007. BKR Restaurants was found liable for a total of 87 violations of IRCA for not having Forms I-9 ready for 22 employees, and improperly completing Forms I-9 for 65 employees. Barnett Taylor was issued similar charges for not having Forms I-9 ready for 74 employees, and improperly completing Forms I-9 for nine employees.

Both BKR Restaurants and Barnett Taylor gave reasons for their failure in properly completing and retaining Forms I-9 for their employees; however, neither restaurant had convincing evidence bolstering their claims. Although OCAHO has supported a trend of reducing penalty amounts, OCAHO still requires companies to provide adequate evidence  against ICE’s allegations. None of the companies’ explanations created a defense of impossibility, which can only be established if the Forms I-9 has been completed but then lost or destroyed in a burglary or fire.

No final penalties were brought upon either restaurant; instead, OCAHO gave both restaurants 30 days to make additional filings — allowing the companies to right their wrongs.

Lesson Learnt

Initiating, processing, maintaining and auditing procedures for companies and employers are absolutely vital to the health of a company. Such procedures will assist in minimizing and quantifying employer liability, and more importantly will assist and enable the counsel for the employer to craft a defense in the event of audit.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

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Planning For the New Year: Form I-9 and E-Verify

With the new year approaching, employers can make some changes and improvements to processing and maintaining Form I-9s. There are Form I-9 best practices that employers should follow to avoid being fined by ICE in an audit. The following are methods to ensure that you, as an employer, are complying with Form I-9 guidelines that have been implemented by USCIS and enforced by ICE. Please also see my Form I-9 series.
  1. Train your team in-house on how to complete I-9 forms and use E-verify successfully.
  2. Don’t be creative while completing forms. If, for instance, the HR specialist forgot to date the form, or the employee did not fill in Section 1 fully — don’t attempt to back-date the form and ask to the employee to complete Section 1. There is always someone who knows the situation and is watching. You could be threatened with punishment, or other employees could rat you out.
  3. The days of the wild, wild west are gone. Today requires a culture of compliance with the rules and laws. It is too expensive for employers and companies to do otherwise.
  4. Hire outside counsel to conduct a year-end audit of all the new forms created since the beginning of the year. At a recent immigration conference, I heard that more than 85% of I-9 forms are filled incorrectly, which means that self-audit is probably not a good idea. Having another employee conduct an audit can be a tricky situation because he/she may not want to point out a superior’s mistakes. The best way is to engage outside counsel to perform the audit; this audit can be part of a wage and hour audit.
  5. Brainstorm about your on-boarding policies and your “exit” interviews. Review policies for document examination; and recording and re-verification of documents for various visa-based and non-visa-based employees. Aim for consistent employee procedures — this means creating a handbook for procedures. Ensure your employees review the handbook before they attempt to examine and record documents on the I-9.
  6. Beware of audits by other federal agencies — they share information and are looking to collect fines. A wage and hour audit can turn into an I-9 and E-verify audit nightmare.
  7. Audits take time and are an unproductive task: they cost company money and employee time, and lead to lost profits. Take the time to understand the I-9 process.
  8. Audits ruin company reputations — names of companies that are audited are made public on federal websites. ICE, OSC and DOL publish announcements of audits.   Sushi Zushi, a San Antonio restaurant, lost workers and shut down after an announcement of an ICE audit. Employees left in droves; without employees, the restaurant had to shut down 8 locations.
  9. The new I-9 will create new challenges. Allocate a budget for training and compliance.
  10. Reduce liability by purging old I-9s.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

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ICE’s Official Guidelines for Electronic I-9 System Audits

In response to an electronic Forms I-9 provider, US Immigration and Customs (ICE) issued guidelines for maintaining an electronic I-9 system for employers.

In early October, ICE issued their official guidelines for assessing electronic Form I-9 systems in an audit. These guidelines tell Homeland Security Investigator (HSI) agents and auditors what Form I-9 information to gather from employers’ electronic systems – guidelines that also help HSI agents to determine I-9 related fines, based on electronic I-9 requirements.

Though ICE has been continually augmenting regulations for its two-year-old electronic I-9 system, storing Forms I-9 electronically is still an employer’s safest bet. Storing Forms I-9 electronically helps to minimize paperwork and paperwork errors; it also allows for easier management and incorporation of E-Verify, which saves time and prevents variances.

A New Framework

In an effort to streamline their I-9 audit procedures, ICE has created a new framework for assessing I-9 systems. If you’re sent a Notice of Inspection (NOI), these are the things you need to know:

1. Audit Trail

Full electronic I-9 compliance means employers must have an audit trail. ICE guidelines require an employer’s electronic system to make a secure and permanent record – and for this record to reflect the date of use, why it was used and what it was used for – when an electronic Form I-9 is created or changed. Since this is the number one investigative method for ICE, it should be an employer’s number one priority.

In order to show the audit trail, specific actions should be taken by an employer when creating and managing Form I-9. A thorough electronic I-9 system will record:

    • the creation of a form for an employee
    • personal information, employee testimony, electronic signatures and dates, any further documentation
    • any updated or altered information

Such a trail is needed so that ICE agents can determine whether an employer’s practices are in compliance with ICE regulations, and whether ICE must issue civil fines.

2. Software Provider & Operating Procedure

When an employer receives an NOI, ICE will ask for the name of the employer’s electronic I-9 system software provider. ICE needs this information so that the agents can gain a better understanding of how the system functions.

In an audit, the employer will have to provide a thorough explanation of their operating system. The employer should make ICE’s job as easy as possible; the employer’s chosen system should be simple and easy to use.

3. Indexing System

Indexing systems catalog employees by name and other attributes, which is helpful in the case of an ICE audit. Employers must make sure that their indexing systems have safeguards that can avoid duplication of employees or Forms I-9. Employers should steer away from systems that merge payroll, tax and employment verification with Forms I-9 – these different areas of information should be stored separately.

4. Electronic Signature

ICE’s regulations on electronic signatures are somewhat unclear. What is clear is that employers must develop a standard procedure for acquiring an employee’s electronic signature, and must guarantee that the signature on the Form I-9 is actually the employee’s. ICE will inspect electronic signatures to ensure that the “significance”– that the employee understands what he/she is signing – has been maintained.

5. Hardcopies

ICE regulations require that an employer’s operating system be able to produce hardcopies of electronic Forms I-9; the best systems will allow the employer to download a PDF version of electronic records.

6. System Demonstration

A system demonstration doesn’t seem like a necessity, but sometimes software vendors have a knack for misleading their customers. For a better user experience, some vendors have added fields, which are not on the original Form I-9; or they have moved fields around – i.e. fields from section 2 are in section 1. Such renderings can sometimes lead to accidental in compliance, and alter the meaning of the form.

Conclusion

While many employers are in favor of electronic I-9 systems – it reduces paperwork and is easily accessible – let us remember two cases. The first is the case of Abercrombie & Fitch, where the electronic I-9 system erased several employees’ records and the company was unable to produce them in reply to an NOI from ICE. The second is the case of UCSD Medical Center, where the electronic I-9 system prompted HR to ask for documents that were not required from naturalized citizens and permanent residents, leading to charges of document abuse and monetary fines.

Different electronic vendors have different programs – before entering into or storing Form I-9 electronically, the employer needs to do some due diligence to ensure the program follows compliance procedures mandated by ICE. It’s best to consult an immigration attorney when previewing an electronic system.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

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Part XII: Retaining and Storing I-9

This is Part XII of our I-9 blog series, which explains how employers can best avoid audit by ICE. In our last segment, we will be detailing the most affective methods of retaining and storing Forms I-9.

Retaining Form I-9

Employers must have a completed Form I-9 and Employment Eligibility Verification on file for each person on their payroll. The employer must also determine how much longer to keep the employee’s Form I-9 after the employee leaves.

To calculate how long to keep an employee’s Form I-9, enter the following:

Employers must retain Form I-9 until the date on Line C.

Employers are required to retain the page of the form on which the employer and the employee enter data. Copies of the employee’s documents should also be kept with the I-9. Employers may store the instructions and Lists of Acceptable Documents page as well. The I-9 may be stored on paper, microfilm, microfiche or electronically.

Storing Form I-9

Form I-9 requires the collection of personal information about individual employees. Employers should keep this in mind when determining how to retain and store completed Forms I-9. Employers should store completed Forms I-9 and accompanying documents in a manner that fits their business needs, and fits the requirement to make Forms I-9 available for inspection. Typically, employers store completed Forms I-9 and accompanying documents:

• on-site or at an off-site storage facility
• with personnel records or separate from personnel records
• in a single format or a combination of formats
• paper
• microfilm or microfiche
• electronically

No matter how you choose to store Forms I-9, you must be able to present them to government officials for inspection within three days of the date on which the forms were requested. Officers from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), employees from the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices at the Department of Justice (DOJ), and employees from the Department of Labor (DOL) may ask to inspect these forms.

Storing the Original Paper Forms I-9
Form I-9 contains personal information about employees. When storing these forms, USCIS recommends that employers provide adequate safeguards to protect employee information. If an employer chooses to keep paper copies of an employee’s documents, the employer may store them with the employee’s Form I-9 or with the employees’ records.  However, USCIS recommends that employers keep Forms I-9 separate from personnel records to facilitate an inspection request.

Storing Forms I-9 on Microfilm or Microfiche
Employers may keep copies of original, signed Forms I-9 on microfilm or microfiche. Select film stock that will preserve the image and allow for access and use for the entire retention period.

Microfilm or microfiche must:
• exhibit a high degree of legibility and readability when displayed on a reader, or reproduced on paper.
• include a detailed index of all data so that any particular record can be accessed immediately.

If an officer notifies an employer of an inspection, the employer must provide the microfilm or microfiche and a reader-printer that provides safety features; is in a clean condition, properly maintained and in good working order; and is able to display and print a complete page of information. Once employers have preserved Forms I-9 on microfilm or microfiche, they may destroy the paper originals.

Storing Forms I-9 Electronically
Employers may use a paper system, an electronic system or a combination of paper and electronic systems to store Forms I-9. An electronic storage system must include:
• controls to ensure the integrity, accuracy and reliability of the electronic storage system.
• controls to detect and prevent the unauthorized or accidental creation of, addition to, alteration of, deletion of or deterioration of an electronically stored Form I-9, including the electronic signature, if used.
• controls to ensure an audit trail so that any alteration or change to the form since its creation is electronically stored and can be accessed by an appropriate government agency inspecting the forms.
• an inspection and quality assurance program that regularly evaluates the electronic generation or storage system, and includes periodic checks of electronically stored Forms I-9, including the electronic signature, if used.
• a detailed index of all data so that any particular record can be accessed immediately.
• production of a high degree of legibility and readability when displayed on a video display terminal or reproduced on paper.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

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Part XI: Correcting I-9

This is Part XI of our I-9 blog series, which explains how employers can best avoid audit by ICE.

Correcting Mistakes

When correcting errors on Form I-9, only the employee can correct Section 1; the employer can correct Sections 2 and 3. If the employer discovers an error in Section 1, then the employer should ask the employee to make the corrections. The best way to correct the form is to cross-out any inaccurate information. After entering the correct information, initial and date the correction.

Multiple Errors

If the employer needs to correct multiple errors, then the employer may redo the section on a new Form I-9 and attach it to the old form. A new Form I-9 can be completed if major errors, such as entire sections being left blank, need to be corrected. A note should be included in the file detailing the reason the employer made changes to an existing Form I-9, or completed a new Form I-9. It is not in the employer’s best interest to conceal any changes made on the form–doing so may lead to increased liability under federal immigration law.

Make the method of correction uniform for all Form I-9 corrections. If the employer uses abbreviations, keep an index of abbreviations for use by the auditor.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

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What would you do? Examples for I-9 Employers

I recently attended a seminar presented by Ronald Lee, attorney from the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) in St. Louis, Missouri. I thought the examples provided were a useful tool to illustrate why an employer who employs only US citizens should be wary of civil rights violations under Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), as amended by the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA).

Henry’s lettuce harvest is not as large as usual–he needs fewer workers this season. He needs to make a choice between Juan and Pedro. Juan is authorized to work and is a permanent resident, or a green card holder; Pedro is also work authorized, but is a refugee with a temporary work permit. Henry ultimately decides to keep Juan because he is a green card holder.

IRCA was the first Federal law that made it illegal to knowingly employ workers who were not authorized to work in the US. After the enactment of IRCA, employers were required to confirm the identity and work eligibility of all employees hired after November 1986, not just workers who appear foreign or those who speak with an accent.

You might think that since your company only hires US workers, your company does not violate I-9. Think again! You are the President of the company with a hiring policy of employing US citizens and not employing anyone who looks foreign. As the President, you and the company are probably engaging in national origin and citizenship status discrimination by requiring all hires to be US citizens.

An aggrieved party can file a complaint with OSC. The complaint form is available at OSC complaints in English, Spanish, Vietnamese and Chinese languages.

Employers can call anonymously to ask for guidance in their hiring practices 1-800-255-8155.

Going back to our example–has Henry committed citizenship status discrimination? Pedro is a protected person under the law. A protected person is a US citizen, a green card holder, permanent resident, refugee or asylee. Henry’s firing decision cannot be based on just ‘status’, nor can Henry only hire US citizens.

Why should employers care? OSC imposes huge fines on the employer, including training and reporting mandates imposed on the employer that last between 18 months and 3 years. These are costs an employer does not need in this, or any, economy.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA

Immigration Attorney

Copyright 2012.  All rights reserved.

This blog is not intended as legal advice, only as illustrations.

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