Students at at UNNJ lose their visa!

ICE cancels F-1 Student visas

On April 4 and 5, 2016, the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) terminated the visa of nonimmigrant students who had enrolled at the University of Northern New Jersey (UNNJ), and the visas of nonimmigrant students who had transferred from UNNJ.

Why?

The students were found to have knowingly participated in visa fraud because they enrolled at UNNJ to obtain an illegal to maintain their F-1 nonimmigrant status.

UNNJ is a school operated by Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Newark. It was created as a part of an enforcement action that targeted SEVP-certified schools and officials who sought to fraudulently utilize SEVP and the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) to commit various violations of federal law.

There are approximately 60 students who are affected and who will receive notification of cancellation of their visa.

Students who are terminated because they were currently  or  enrolled before at UNNJ and choose not to file for reinstatement or have applied to USCIS for reinstatement and whose application is denied, must depart the country immediately.

Not Eligible for Transfer

These students are not eligible for to transfer to another SEVP-certified school unless U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) approves the student for reinstatement following the student’s termination. Students who transferred to another school from UNNJ will also be terminated and their new school will be notified of the cancellation of their visa.

What to do now?

Call SEVP Response Center at 703-603-3400. This number is staffed from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (ET), Monday through Friday, except holidays. The SEVP Response Center is closed every Wednesday from 12:45 to 1:30 p.m. ET for system maintenance and testing.

Provide the following information when calling:

  • First and last name
  • SEVIS ID number
  • Address
  • Telephone number where you can be reached
  • E-mail address
  • Current SEVP-certified school

Nalini Mahadevan JD, MBA

Attorney at Law

314-932-7111 office

nsm@mlolaw.us

website: Mlolaw.us

Disclaimer:  Not meant as legal advice. NOT meant to create an attorney client relationship.  Please call an attorney to obtain advice pertaining to your legal situation.

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OSC Document Abuse Settlements

The Errors that Employers Commit

Some hiring mistakes end up costing employers a lot of money and time, and loss of reputation. This past October, the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) arrived at an agreement with the New Jersey-based home healthcare provider, Advantage Home Care, LLC, which was charged for violating the anti-discrimination provision of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). Advantage Home Care was asking new hires, who were lawful permanent residents, to present additional and different documents during the Form I-9 employment eligibility verification process.

The claim was brought to OSC by an individual who applied for a job. When the individual applied to Advantage Home Care, the company ran a criminal background check and wrongly determined that the individual was using an invalid Social Security number (SSN). The individual went to the Social Security Administration, which concluded that the SSN was valid; however, Advantage Home Care would not employ the applicant. Upon further investigation, OSC found that Advantage Home Care required lawful permanent residents to provide more documents to validate work authorization than US citizens. The INA prohibits such discrimination.

In early October, similar charges were brought upon Las Vegas-based Tuscany Hotel and Casino, LLC. The company was also found to be using discriminatory practices during the employment eligibility verification and re-verification processes.

A complaint was filed with OSC in May 2012, asserting that Tuscany was asking non-citizen job applicants to provide additional or different documents during the work authorization process; US Citizen applicants were not asked to present more documents. Once hired, and in order to remain employed, the company then asked non-citizen employees to provide further document requests during the re-verification process. Moreover, non-citizen employees were subject to severe reviews, which US citizen employees didn’t have to endure.

Expensive Mistakes for Employers

Per OSC’s agreement with Advantage Home Care, the company will pay $1,633 to the individual and $46,575 in civil penalties to the US. Advantage Home Care must also pay back pay to previous job applicants who suffered financially from the company’s policy. Additionally, the company’s human resources staff will be trained in employers’ responsibilities and best practices to prevent discrimination during the employment eligibility verification process. In order to ensure compliance, Advantage Home Care’s staff will also be monitored by OSC for three years.

Under the agreement, Tuscany will pay $49,000 in civil penalties to the US and make payments to the complainant. Tuscany will administer new employment eligibility verification policies and practices that will eradicate any employment-based discrimination. Additionally, the company will train its staff on how best to avoid discrimination in the verification process, and will be monitored for compliance.

Lessons Learnt

Employers must train HR personnel on the proper documentation methods for ‘onboarding’ employees. In addition to training, written guidance or manuals for proper intake are necessary to avoid financial penalties, and work stoppage due to worksite audit. Losses may occur because workers are redirected to answering the government, providing requested documents and undergoing mandatory training as part of the worksite enforcement action. An employer’s reputation can suffer because the audit and fines are reported on government and public websites, and news media. Employers can use an immigration attorney to prevent these costly mistakes.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

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How DACA Affects Employers

As of today, USCIS has received 298,834 applications for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) eligibility. Of these, 53,273 have been approved; workers who have been approved will either seek new employment or continue with past employment. My previous blog post from mid-October discussed how employers could unintentionally admit to ‘knowingly’ hiring unauthorized workers who apply for DACA.

DACA allows illegal immigrants, who meet certain guidelines, to remain in the US. Individuals who receive approval, also receive USCIS-issue work authorization cards called Employment Authorization Document (EAD) to demonstrate eligibility to work in the US for US employers.

Under current law, employers must keep a Form I-9 for all hired employees, both citizens and non-citizens, who are engaged to work in the US. USCIS has now issued specific guidance for employers about treatment of DACA recipients’ EAD cards, and procedures to record and process their Forms I-9 for these employees.

Hiring new Employees with EAD cards issued under DACA

In order to properly complete a Form I-9, certain documentation is required to prove both identity and employment authorization; under List A, an unexpired EAD is an acceptable document for Form I-9 completion.

The DACA EAD provides proof that an employee has been allowed to stay in the US and has been authorized to work, but has no legal status. The employer can enter EAD information in Section 2 under List A since an EAD card provides both proof of identity and work authorization. The EAD alone provides I-9 proof of the employee’s ability to work in the US; if the employer is presented with an EAD, he or she may not ask for additional documents. When an EAD expires, the employer must reverify that the employee still has work authorization in Section 3 of Form I-9.

Guidance for Processing Existing Employees

Employers who collect updated documentation from employees should examine the employee’s previously completed Form I-9 to decide whether a new Form I-9 should be completed for that employee, or decide to only complete Section 3 of the original Form I-9.

Employers should complete a new Form I-9, write the original hire date in Section 2 and attach the new I-9 to the old I-9 if any of the following changes from Section 1 of the previously completed I-9:

  • employee’s name
  • date of birth
  • attestation
  • social security number (if one was provided)

Employers should only complete Section 3 of the previously completed I-9 if:

  • information from Section 1 hasn’t changed or if
  • the employee provides a new EAD

The employer should examine the documentation for authenticity; and, if provided, record the document title, number and expiration date. Employers should also sign and date Section 3.

Guidance on E-Verify

If the employer must complete a new Form I-9, and uses E-Verify, then the employer should confirm the new I-9 information through E-Verify. If the employer only has to complete Section 3 of I-9, then an E-Verify check is not required.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

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