CBP Announces Electronic Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record

Form I-94 is the main way in which persons who are not US citizens, and who are not legal permanent residents, demonstrate their legal entry into the US. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) have announced the digital automation of Form I-94 Arrival/Departure, which will standardize travelers’ arrival and inspection processes, and ultimately lower costs and travelers’ wait time. Currently, CBP does not have a fail-safe method of keeping track of non-immigrant departures — an electronic I-94 could eliminate this loophole.

In late March, CBP published an interim final rule to the Federal Register, which redefines the definition of Form I-94 to include the electronic format and will be effective on April 26, 2013. Non-immigrants, who enter the US by air or sea will not have to submit paper Forms I-94.  But those who are subject to secondary inspection and asylees, refugees and parolees, will be required have to submit a paper form given to them by a Customs and Border Patrol officer. Travelers who enter through land border ports of entry will receive paper versions of Form I-94.

CBP will maintain I-94 records for all travelers who require one, but all records will instead be entered into the system in an electronic format and not given to the traveler. CBP will scan the traveler’s passport, creating an electronic arrival record for that person. Travelers will receive a CBP admission stamp on their travel documents, which detail the date and class of admission, and the admitted-until date. Departures will also be recorded electronically — if the traveler has a paper I-94, then he/she must surrender it upon leaving the US.

Some agencies will require a paper copy of Form I-94. USCIS will ask applicants to fill out paper copies when requesting particular benefits; and the State Department of Motor Vehicles (DMVs) will ask for paper copy submissions. In addition, non-immigrants with work authorization can present paper copies of Form I-94 to their employers during the Form I-9 process. If a traveler needs a paper copy of Form I-94, it will be available at www.cbp.gov/I94.

The Takeaway

Since this program is very new, we can expect confusion from all corners for a while, and differences in enforcement and paper documentation requirements from agencies. If you are a non-citizen, who is not a permanent resident, you will not receive a paper I-94 form from CBP as you enter the US, if you come by air or by sea. You will continue to receive a paper I-94 if you come by land from Canada or Mexico, if you require a secondary inspection, or you are a refugee or asylee. The problem is that USCIS and individual state-run agencies, such as drivers licence bureaus, will continue to require the now defunct I-94 form. In addition, it will become important to log onto the CBP website to ascertain that all your details on the electronic record are correct, and to print out a copy for your non-immigrant record. The electronic record will be erased from the system on departure from the US — maintaining a paper copy to prove departure may be useful under these new circumstances.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

Social Share Toolbar
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

H1B cap has reached!

USCIS received 124,000 H1B visa applications from Monday April 1, 2013 to Friday April 5, 2013 — the cap has not been filled this fast for about 4 years. The number of applications received includes both cap subject bachelor degree holders and US Master Degree holders for whom a special 20,000 visas are allotted.

US Master degree holders get two bites of the apple, when it comes to ‘cap’ time. All US Master degree applications not counted towards the 20,000 cap will be considered again in the regular cap of 65,000 visas. Master degree applications are subject to the lottery first, before the bachelor degree holders. Please keep in mind also that this 65,000 number is reduced by 5,800 visas set aside for Chile and Singapore, under Free Trade Treaties that the US has signed with these countries. The unused visas from this ‘carve out’ is added back to the general pool of available cap subject visas.

USCIS announced that it conducted a lottery to allot visas using a computer generated selection process on Sunday, April 7, 2013. All those applications not selected will be returned to the employers or attorneys. Of course, the return process may not occur for a while, as applications are vetted for accuracy and correct application fees. Application fees will be returned with the applications if the package is not selected in the lottery.

H1B applications filed with premium processing will be processed in 15 days, if they are selected in the lottery.

No more applications will be accepted by USCIS, but H1B applications to change employers, or extension of visa applications filed by non-profit employers and concurrent H1B employment, can still be filed with USCIS.

The Takeaway

Contact your Senator and Congressional representative to encourage an increase in the number of visas available for H1B visas. H1B visas filed by entrepreneurs are also subject to the cap. Entrepreneurs are employment multipliers for the U.S. economy.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

Social Share Toolbar
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

2014 H1B Cap Might Hit in the First Week

Speculation about the H1B visa cap has been all-consuming in the business community. For 2014, USCIS has stated that all 65,000 H1B visas, and 20,000 H1B visas reserved for US Masters degree holders, would be finished in the first 5 days of filing from April 1 (Monday) to April 5 (Friday).

USCIS also stated that it would monitor the number of petitions received and notify the public of the date on which the numerical limit of the H-1B cap had been met, which is called the final receipt date. If USCIS receives more than 85,000 visa application petitions (regular and cap visas, disregarding the carve-outs for Singapore and Chile under Free Trade Agreements signed by the US with those countries), USCIS will use a lottery system to randomly select the number of petitions required to reach the limit of 85,000 visas.

USCIS will reject petitions that are subject to the cap and are not selected. USCIS will also reject any petitions that are received after the necessary number of petitions needed to meet the cap are filled. The last time USCIS conducted a lottery for the H-1B cap was in April of 2008.

The Consequences

Pronouncements like this have led to a frantic need to file on the first day, so that the cap is not missed. The problem is that this artificial season does not necessarily meet the hiring cycles for US business and employers. In other words, US business employment practices are artificially constrained by the necessity to tailor employment hiring practices to coincide with a start on April 1. Depending on the industry, employers hire throughout the year, varying with the ebbs and flow of business.

The Takeaway

Immigration reform proposed by the 8 Senators has a more realistic view of the business world — i.e. releasing visas as the demand grows, in a stepped up basis. Now that we are talking about the ‘reality’ on the ground for employers and business, could we have a more realistic PERM labor system? I know, if wishes were horses…. But I can dream the immigration dream, can’t I?

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

Social Share Toolbar
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

The New and Improved I-9 Form

On March 8, 2013, USCIS published a new Form I-9 for employers to use for new hires, which is for immediate use. USCIS received over 6,000 comments on the form and has tried to incorporate some of the suggestions. To ensure that the correct form is being used, look for the form’s date in the lower right-hand corner of the form.

When Should Employers Use the New I-9

The new form is to be used for all new hires. The 3 day rule remains, which is to fill Section 1 within 3 days of starting work. The form can also be filled in advance, as long as an offer of employment has been made and accepted. If the old form was used and the employee has not started work, a new form should be used in lieu of the old form.

The new form should be used for both US citizens and non-citizens, if they are working within the geographical boundaries of the United States of America. If a new office or an employee is hired in Mexico or Canada, there is no obligation to maintain a Form I-9 for the new hire. Employers should use the new Forms I-9 from 8 March, 2013 onwards. Older forms dated 02/02/2009 and 08/07/2009 can be used until May 7th, 2013.

The Spanish version can be filled out by new hires only in Puerto Rico. On the mainland, the Spanish version can be utilized as a translation tool for Spanish speaking new hires, but only an English language version Form I-9 can be filled out by both the employer and employee and retained by the employer.

The New Form

The new form is 7 pages of instruction and two pages of form to be filled. Section 1 occupies its own page, with expanded areas for the employee to fill personal identifying information. The expanded area allows work-authorized non-citizens to complete their information.

Page 2 of the form is divided between Section 2 and 3. Section 2 is renamed to include authorized representative review and Section 3 is now called “Reverification and Rehires”, instead of “Updating and Reverification”. Section 3 is to be used for employees who return to work after an absence of time. Once the initial I-9 is filled out by the employee, the employer cannot ask legal permanent residents or US citizens to present new documents to complete reverification for work authorization.

The Takeaway

The form is more detailed and thus, may have more pitfalls. Print the new form on both sides of the paper to keep both pages together. The 67 page book of “Instructions” is now called “Guidance”. The important step is to start using the new form and to cease using the old form. Section 1 cannot be populated by electronic programs used to ‘onboard’ new hires. Employer liability, audits and monetary fines remain the same under the old and new forms.

We are available to discuss the new form or needs for training and assistance.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

Social Share Toolbar
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

The New “Hardship” Filing Rule in Immigration Law

Earlier in January, Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano announced that on 4 March 2013, USCIS‘s new family unity waiver process will go into effect. The new process will decrease the amount of time US citizens are apart from their immediate relatives — spouse, children and parents — who are in the process of acquiring visas for lawful permanent residency in the US. Particular individuals can fill out a form, called a provisional unlawful presence waiver, before leaving the US and interviewing in their home country.

Final Rule

“This final rule facilitates the legal immigration process and reduces the amount of time that US citizens are separated from their immediate relatives who are in the process of obtaining an immigrant visa,” said Secretary Napolitano.

Current Law

Current law is much different. According to current law, a US citizen’s immediate relatives, who cannot adjust their status to become US lawful permanent residents, must depart the US and acquire an immigrant visa in their country of origin. Those who have unlawfully been in the US for more than six months must obtain a waiver that overlooks their unlawful status and overstay before the can return to the US after going to their home country to appear at  US Embassy or Consulate to be approved for an immigrant visa.  This has  meant that if the waiver was denied by the Consulate abroad, the relative was not allowed to re-enter the United States to be re-united with their family.  A great many people were therefore understandably reluctant to avail themselves of this benefit without a decent chance of a favorable outcome.

Qualifying for a Waiver

In order to qualify for a provisional unlawful presence waiver, the applicant must be an immediate relative of a US citizen, inadmissible only on account of unlawful presence and show that a rejected waiver will end in “hardship” for the applicant’s US citizen relative.  The grounds of waiver remain the same.  The wait time is reduced because the waiver is adjudicated by USICS in the United States and therefore the wait time outside the US is reduced.

The New Process

The new process will have a new form, Form I-601A, Application for a Provisional Unlawful Presence Waiver. Individuals who apply under the new waiver must inform the DOS’s National Visa Center before filing.

The Takeaway

The new waiver process will allow eligible applicants to remain in the US while anticipating the outcome of their application. No more waiting in Ciudad Juarez, where local dangers await the unwary; where being found inadmissible means that families have to make the choice to leave the US, and cannot re-unite with a spouse or parent.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

Social Share Toolbar
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

USCIS Enters the Digital Age

In an effort to modernize and systemize immigration policy, USCIS recently launched the USCIS Policy Manual Page. The Policy Manual page will be split into three phases: the first phase is information on USCIS Citizenship and Naturalization policies — following phases will encompass further updates to different areas of immigration law.

USCIS’s new Policy Manual will, at some point, take the place of the current Adjudicator’s Field Manual (AFM). The rejuvenated Policy Manual will digitally streamline most aspects of immigration policy, including policy updates, immigration forms, updated and extended table of contents, and URLs to INA and CFR sections. USCIS will also supply dates for when updates have occurred on the Policy Manual page, which can be found here.

USCIS is making progress towards e-filing and digitizing its data and adjudications. Last May, USCIS introduced its Electronic Immigration System (ELIS) program. The system was created to enable immigration benefit seekers and legal representatives to create an account to file for benefits, and extend visas, online. The program is now moving towards welcoming other visa processes.

Today, immigration law is like a piece of Swiss cheese: if the body of the cheese represents the law, the larger holes are filled in with regulations and the small holes with memos from USCIS Directors. This still leaves some situations unaddressed or ripe for litigation and denials.

The Takeaway

Currently, all the resources for naturalization, laws, regulations, memos and AFM, have been consolidated in the policy manual. We hope highly complex areas, such as H1B visa and L visa filings and adjudications can be consolidated in the policy manual, offering the filer the assurance that all the legal resources related to the filing have been exhausted. This will lend transparency to adjudications and certainty to the law. Dare I dream?

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

Social Share Toolbar
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

USCIS Develops Tools to Help Foreign Entrepreneurs in the US

In late November, USCIS Director Alejandro Mayorkas revealed a new addition to the Entrepreneurs in Residence (EIR) initiative, an online resource center called Entrepreneur Pathways. The digital resource center will aid entrepreneurs, who are looking to start a business in the US, in maneuvering through the immigration process.

The EIR initiative

The USCIS EIR initiative was instituted in early 2012, and works to bolster USCIS policies and economic growth using industry expertise. The EIR Team is comprised of USCIS immigration and business experts who work together to standardize the process for obtaining various nonimmigrant visa categories that are often utilized by entrepreneurs.

Additionally, the EIR team has also:

  • Developed and deployed a training workshop for USCIS employment-based immigration officers that focuses on startup businesses and the environment for early-stage innovations;
  • Trained a team of specialized immigration officers to handle entrepreneur and startup cases;
  • Modified Request for Evidence templates for certain nonimmigrant visa categories to incorporate new types of relevant evidence into the adjudicative process; and
  • Developed a plan for quarterly engagements with the entrepreneurial community to ensure that USCIS stays current with industry practices.

One of the team’s main goals is to find a way for foreign entrepreneurs to establish a business in the US within the scope of immigration law. In order to continue to build momentum, the EIR team will remain in effect until April 2013.

What We Need Now

A great first step has been taken by USCIS using the present framework to answer a need for self-sponsorship by entrepreneurs; but the same processing-bottlenecks remain in place, such as long waits for filing adjustment of status to complete the ‘green card’ process due to backlogged priority dates. We may be better served instead if there were more treaty countries added to the E-Treaty Trader and Treaty Investor Visas, or if there was a separate category of E-Investor Visa at the $250,000 investment level with a requirement for four full-time jobs created.

Subscribe to read my blog regularly. Your comments are welcomed.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

Social Share Toolbar
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

How DACA Affects Employers

As of today, USCIS has received 298,834 applications for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) eligibility. Of these, 53,273 have been approved; workers who have been approved will either seek new employment or continue with past employment. My previous blog post from mid-October discussed how employers could unintentionally admit to ‘knowingly’ hiring unauthorized workers who apply for DACA.

DACA allows illegal immigrants, who meet certain guidelines, to remain in the US. Individuals who receive approval, also receive USCIS-issue work authorization cards called Employment Authorization Document (EAD) to demonstrate eligibility to work in the US for US employers.

Under current law, employers must keep a Form I-9 for all hired employees, both citizens and non-citizens, who are engaged to work in the US. USCIS has now issued specific guidance for employers about treatment of DACA recipients’ EAD cards, and procedures to record and process their Forms I-9 for these employees.

Hiring new Employees with EAD cards issued under DACA

In order to properly complete a Form I-9, certain documentation is required to prove both identity and employment authorization; under List A, an unexpired EAD is an acceptable document for Form I-9 completion.

The DACA EAD provides proof that an employee has been allowed to stay in the US and has been authorized to work, but has no legal status. The employer can enter EAD information in Section 2 under List A since an EAD card provides both proof of identity and work authorization. The EAD alone provides I-9 proof of the employee’s ability to work in the US; if the employer is presented with an EAD, he or she may not ask for additional documents. When an EAD expires, the employer must reverify that the employee still has work authorization in Section 3 of Form I-9.

Guidance for Processing Existing Employees

Employers who collect updated documentation from employees should examine the employee’s previously completed Form I-9 to decide whether a new Form I-9 should be completed for that employee, or decide to only complete Section 3 of the original Form I-9.

Employers should complete a new Form I-9, write the original hire date in Section 2 and attach the new I-9 to the old I-9 if any of the following changes from Section 1 of the previously completed I-9:

  • employee’s name
  • date of birth
  • attestation
  • social security number (if one was provided)

Employers should only complete Section 3 of the previously completed I-9 if:

  • information from Section 1 hasn’t changed or if
  • the employee provides a new EAD

The employer should examine the documentation for authenticity; and, if provided, record the document title, number and expiration date. Employers should also sign and date Section 3.

Guidance on E-Verify

If the employer must complete a new Form I-9, and uses E-Verify, then the employer should confirm the new I-9 information through E-Verify. If the employer only has to complete Section 3 of I-9, then an E-Verify check is not required.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

Social Share Toolbar
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

Employment Practices that Could Lead to Immigration Discrimination

In order to help employers, the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) sometimes answers immigration-related questions about unfair employment practices, such as an employee presenting either invalid or fraudulent documents.

When an employee provides fraudulent documents, an employer is allowed to request the employee to present a different document. However, the employer’s concern may be that the employee could be committing a felony; and that if the employer asks for more documentation, the employee might commit an additional felony.

The employer needs to remember that the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) disallows four types of unlawful conduct. The employer is not allowed to discriminate on the basis of:

1. citizenship or immigration status discrimination;
2. national origin discrimination
3. unfair documentary practices during the employment eligibility verification (Form 1-9) process (“document abuse”); and
4 retaliation for filing a charge or asserting rights under the anti-discrimination provision.

(source)

An employer might be in violation of USCIS policy 8 U.S.C. § 1324a, which makes employment of unauthorized aliens unlawful if the employer is aware that a document is fraudulent but accepts it. If an employer rejects a document that seems to be invalid, then the employer is allowed to ask the employee to present a different document from the Lists of Acceptable Documents from Form I-9. In order to steer clear of violating anti-discrimination laws, employers should examine documents equally for all employees.

Company Policy

Another issue pertains to whether a company policy can fire anyone that presents fraudulent documents, and regard such individuals as unqualified for rehire. It is illegal for an employer to ‘knowingly’ hire an individual who is not authorized to work in the US. The statue 8 U.S.C. § 1324a(a)(1) states, “Employers determined to have knowingly hired or continued to employ unauthorized workers…will be required to cease the unlawful activity, may be fined, and in certain situations may be criminally prosecuted.” If an employee’s document is genuine but the employer deems it to be fraudulent, then the employee can bring charges under the anti-discrimination provision, or INA. During such a case, OSC’s investigation would concentrate on the employer’s objective.

Sometimes an employer can have a company policy of regarding individuals who provide invalid documents as unqualified for rehire. An employee can file charges under the anti-discrimination policy if the employer disallows a work-authorized employee from employment, based on the individual’s previously undocumented status. This sort of “dishonest policy” would be investigated by OSC, wherein OSC would focus on whether the policy is consistently applied, without observance of citizenship status or supposed national origin. OSC will also determine if the employee was terminated based on citizenship status discrimination. However, a consistent treatment of a “dishonesty policy” would not be a violation of the anti-discrimination provision.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

Social Share Toolbar
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

Employers Could Admit to ‘Knowingly’ Hiring

Young immigrants applying to Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) must prove that they have lived in the US for at least five years, and one way to obtain evidence is to ask employers to supply proof of job status. However, employers who consent might also be admitting that they ‘knowingly’ hired an unauthorized worker, which violates federal law.

Low Figures

There are an estimated 1.2 million young immigrants who are eligible for DACA, but since Aug. 15, when US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) began accepting applications, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has only received over 82,000 applications. Figures are lower than predicted, partly because of unforeseen drawbacks in DACA guidelines.

If young immigrants receive eligibility for DACA, they receive deferred action and legal work permits; but they do not receive legal immigration status. While DACA does not lead to a ‘green card’, in most states, applicants are eligible for a driver’s license, a huge benefit.

‘Knowingly’ Hiring and New DACA Guidelines

In order to be eligible, young immigrants must be enrolled in school or have a high school diploma, which may present a dilemma for employers and applicants alike. Many employers rely on low-wage labor in order to run their businesses, and many employees are young immigrants who must work in order to pay for university, or who were forced to drop out because they couldn’t afford university costs. It is estimated that 740,000 working immigrants are eligible for DACA.

USCIS, a division of DHS, made addendums to the DACA guidelines, confirming that employers can help verify DACA applicants. Evidence of knowingly hiring unauthorized workers will not be revealed, “unless there is evidence of egregious violations of criminal statutes or widespread abuses,” the guidelines state. All DHS enforcement resources are being directed towards threats on public safety.  However, the term ‘egregious violations’, has not been defined in the guidance.

DACA guidelines ask applicants to provide any Social Security numbers (SSN) they have previously used. Falsification of SSNs, whether they are fake numbers or real numbers belonging to someone else, is a common occurrence and can be seen as evidence of fraud or identity theft. However, the new guidelines state that the form is only inquiring about numbers, “that were officially issued to you by the Social Security Administration.”  Hence no disclosure of social security numbers is required if the number was not specifically applied for by the applicant. This is a huge relief for E-verify employers, who may reduce the possibility of facing social security mismatches and tentative non-confirmation messages from the Social Security Administration.

The bottom line is that no DACA applicant will be given immunity, but DHS is not interested in using the application as a means to discover individuals who may have abused federal law in an employee-employer relationship.

(NYTimes, “Deportation Deferrals Put Employers of Immigrants in a Bind”, 9/26/2012)

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney
Lowenbaum Partnership, LLC
St. Louis, Missouri

The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

Social Share Toolbar
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather