USCIS wants to increase fees!

USCIS proposes increasing filing fees of a lot of commonly used applications.  Most of them are for business immigration filings and family based immigration applications.  See some of the proposed fee increases below.

You can make a comment on the fee increase until July 5, 2016. USCIS depends on the fees to pay for its services. So USCIS was one of the few agencies not affected by the government shut down last year.

Proposed fees

Form Purpose Current Fee Proposed Increase Change
I-129 For Worker $325 $460 +$135
I-130 For Family immigration $420 $535 +$115
I-140 For Work based immigration $580 $700 +$120
I-485 Work/Family GC* $1,070 $1,225 +$155
I-539 Change visas $290 $370 +$80
I-765 Work authorization $385 $410 +$30
I-90 Renew GC $365 $455 +$90
I-129F Fiancé Visa $340 $535 +$195
I-751 Get a 10 year GC* $505 $595 +$90
N-400 Naturalize $595 $640 +$45
N-600 Citizenship Certificate $600 $1170 +$570

*Green Card

Nalini S Mahadevan, Esq

P: 314.932.7111  nsm@mlolaw.us   www.mlolaw.us

Disclaimer: Please do not rely on this blog for legal advice.  Call me if you want to get advice and sign an engagement letter with my law firm.

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Was I chosen in the H1B lottery?

The only way to know for sure that the application was rejected is when the application is returned with the fee checks, or no receipt is received a week from May 2nd, 2016, when all the applications that were chosen were entered in the database.  Another indication of an application being chosen is of course the fees being debited from the attorney’s bank account.

There is no process for inquiring about rejected applications with USCIS.

So hang tight and wait for your receipt or returned application.

Nalini S Mahadevan, Esq. – nsm@mlolaw.us – 314.932.7111 – www.mlolaw.us

Of course you know this is not legal advice and you must consult your own attorney!

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Texas v. United States Reduces Work Eligibility!

3 Year EADs recalled for DACA recipients

The Court in Texas v. US stopped the ability of the federal government to issue work eligibility cards ( employment authorization document or EAD cards) beyond 2 years as allowed under current regulations for DACA eligible recipients.  About 2000 EADs had been issued with a 3 year expiration.  Any 3 year EAD issued after February 16, 2015 has to be returned to USCIS.  About 1200 EAD cards have been returned.  A second letter has also been issued to recipients of 3 year EAD cards.   The last date to return cards is July 17th, 2015.  The letter states that non return can affect deferred action and employment authorization.

3 Year EADs reduced to 2 years eligibility following Texas Court Order

In addition to other measures that are underway, the three-year DACA grants and EAD cards have been invalidated for all of these individuals and changed to two years; the SAVE database that states use to verify eligibility for driver’s licenses and other state benefits has been updated to reflect the two-year authorizations for all of these individuals; and USCIS has now sent two rounds of individualized letters demanding the return of the three-year EAD cards and warning recipients that a failure to return the card could affect their deferred action and employment authorization.

Applies only to DACA holders

This action applies only to DACA EAD cards issued for 3 years.  The 3 year authorization has been reduced to a 2 year eligibility to work.  The Court’s order applies to all 50 states even though it was issued in Texas.

 

 

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The Elephant in the Room

Discrimination in Immigration!  You’re are kidding, right?

I have been reading about double digit denial rates for L1B visa applications from India.  The denial rate for L1B ‘specialized knowledge’ workers out of India is 56% while for Mexico and China it is 22% and 21%.  L1B visas are issued for intracompany transfers from an affiliate or branch to the US Company.  ‘Specialized Knowledge’ requires a worker to have specialized skills about his company’s product. For an Indian applicant who is usually a software engineer that seems to be an insurmountable hurdle for more than half the applicants!   The current standard of adjudication has been drifting upwards.  Now a company needs a ‘star’ employee with astronomical specialized knowledge to be approved.

Many top Fortune 500 companies outsource their technology needs to other companies.  These other companies have operations which run in a 24 hour cycle.  While the US sleeps the work is carried on in China and India.  Now the company wants to bring some of its overseas employees from China and India for some face to face time to promote synergy between the overseas team and the US team, run a ‘SCRUM’ operation, and improve US business profits.  These workers have specialized knowledge of the company customized software built on a platform that is universally available in the US, but these employees are not ‘stars’. The same application has a 50% chance of denial by either USCIS or the US consulate in India and a 21% chance of denial for China.  The only losers are US businesses!

What can we do?

  • File applications for employees who are more senior in the company and have more specialized knowledge about the company’s process, technology or other matter.
  • Document, document, document! the application with every training at every international branch, leadership position in the company, and knowledge based expertize.
  • Then Pray!

Nalini S Mahadevan Esq

nsm@mlolaw.us

314 374 8784

Not meant as legal advice!

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EB-5 for Newbie investors

There are only a few items investors with EB-5 visas need to remember. First, they can choose any size project — either a regional center project or a direct investment project. Second, there is no magic size to the project; project investment can be $500,000 or $1 million, but there is no green card unless the project creates 10 jobs for every investor. The 10 jobs must be created by the time the conditions on residency are approved to be removed by USCIS.

The return on investment is very low — in the low single digits — but the real reward is the green card. So choose a lawyer and a project you can trust to see you to the end of the process.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney St. Louis, Missouri
nsm@mlolaw.us

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The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

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National Visa Center Does Not Want Your Originals!

It has been a big pain to ask clients to send their original documents via mail from overseas for submission to the National Visa Center (NVC). It’s painful because clients are afraid that their documents can be lost in the mail, in their own country, or in the US Attorney’s office, which has to exercise care so that original documents are not lost. Finally, sometimes originals are not returned to clients after the interview by the consular officer interviewing them in the foreign country. For elderly clients who have submitted original documents from countries where they no longer reside, and these documents are over 50 years old, submitting originals to NVC poses a real issue.

Finally, NVC has woken up to the reality of paper, original document preservation and handling, and the burden that it imposes on all concerned. Since the consular officer can examine the originals brought in by the applicant, there seems no reason for original documents to be sent to NVC in the US, only to have them turned around and sent back to where they came from!

Thank you Department of State for finally waking up to reality!

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney St. Louis, Missouri
nsm@mlolaw.us

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The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

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Will You Get Your Green Card Soon?

Obama issues executive orders for Entrepreneurs H1Bs, H-4s, L1Bs, and O-1 visa holders. Read the memo issued by USCIS on Obamas initiatives on visa-based employees below.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney St. Louis, Missouri
nsm@mlolaw.us

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The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

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Massachusetts’ Immigrant Program for Students

Massachusetts has created a loophole program, called Global Entrepreneur in Residence (GER), to permit foreign students to stay legally in the US.

Foreign students who attended college in Massachusetts and who want to pursue entrepreneurial activities in the state can apply to the GER Program, which is being run by the Massachusetts Tech Collaborative, an independent state agency designed to promote the advancement of technology in the state. Chosen individuals will be given a job at a participating universities in Massachusetts—the students will work part-time and will submit visa applications sponsored by the university. The program is expected to grow 46,000 jobs for students.

US immigration law dictates that foreign students can study at US colleges and universities under a student visa—after they graduate, their visas expire and they have to find a US employer to sponsor them for an H-1B visa. The H-1B visa system inherently poses a disadvantage for entrepreneurs, the system only allows for a once-per-year application process—in the form of a lottery—and the slots fill up quickly. On April 7, 2014, USCIS reported that it had secured its quota of 85,000 H-1B visa petitions only five days after it began receiving applications.

This is why the GER Program’s loophole is important: colleges and universities are immune to the cap and can submit applications for employers at any time. This means foreign graduates have a higher chance of obtaining a visa through the GER Program, and through employment with higher-education institutions, because these institutions are exempt from the cap.

The House bill proposed to devise a new category of startup visas for foreign entrepreneurs, while also raising the amount of H-1B visas accessible to immigrants with advanced degrees. While the Massachusetts program is yet to be funded, this is a great start for foreign graduates whom the US needs to retain!

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney St. Louis, Missouri
nsm@mlolaw.us

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The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

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H1B Spouses May Be Allowed to Work in the US

DHS has proposed allowing spouses of H1B visa holders in H4 status to work while waiting for their legal permanent residence to be approved.

The idea is to enhance opportunities for certain groups of highly-skilled workers by removing obstacles to their remaining time in the US, strengthen entrepreneurship and innovation, and to help the US attract and retain highly-skilled immigrants.

The H1B visa holder must have an approved I-140 form and should have an extension of their H1B status beyond 6 years.

Specifically, the change to the regulation would:

  • Update the regulations to include non-immigrant highly-skilled specialty occupation professionals from Chile and Singapore (H-1B1), and from Australia (E-3), in the list of classes of aliens authorized for employment incident to status with a specific employer;
  • Clarify that H-1B1 and principal E-3 non-immigrants are allowed to work without having to separately apply to DHS for employment authorization; and
  • Allow E-3, H-1B1, and CW-1 non-immigrant workers up to 240 days of continued work authorization beyond the expiration date noted on their Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record, while the extension request is pending.

It would affect workers in specialty occupation nonimmigrant classifications for professionals from Chile and Singapore (H-1B1) and Australia (E-3), as well as Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Island (CNMI)-Only Transitional Workers (CW-1).

Finally, this proposal would also expand the current list of evidentiary criteria for employment-based first preference (EB-1) outstanding professors and researchers to allow the submission of evidence comparable to the other forms of evidence already listed in the regulations. This proposal would harmonize the regulations for EB-1 outstanding professors and researchers with other employment-based immigrant categories that already allow for submission of comparable evidence.
The proposed rules will be published shortly and will invite comments for a 60 day period.
See you in my next blog.
Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney St. Louis, Missouri
nsm@mlolaw.us
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The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

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Alternatives to H1B visas

The H1B visa season is upon us, the filing date was on April 1, 2014, and like last year is expected to be oversubscribed. What visas can a company consider once the H1B visas are exhausted for the season?

This year, let us consider non-H1B countries, where alternative visas are available for skilled workers.

For Mexicans and Canadians

The TN visa under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Until this time, only Canadians could apply directly to the consulate or embassy or enter through the Canadian/US border with the proper credentials.

On February 10th, 2014, the US Department of State published a final rule that Mexicans applying for a TN visa could apply at the consulate or embassy in the US without first seeking approval from USCIS, or before applying for a TN visa at the US embassy or consulate in Mexico.

This is a giant leap forward for immigration, according similar trusted status for citizens south of the border.

Of course, applicants must be sponsored by an employer with a genuine job offer, and job duties must conform to the NAFTA guidelines.

While TN visas require non-immigrant intent—which means the applicant cannot apply for a green card from a TN visa status—the visa allows renewal in the US, and under tax treaties, allows the worker to accumulate the equivalent of Social Security in their country of origin.

There used to be a ceiling on admissions of TN, but that is not the case anymore.

See you in my next blog.

Nalini S Mahadevan, JD, MBA
Immigration Attorney St. Louis, Missouri

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The information is not meant to create a client-attorney relationship. This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for legal advice. Situations may differ based on the facts.

Tara Mahadevan
Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

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